Isabaya Teasera & Its Soulful Music

Isibaya is a TV series that takes place in a taxi business in South Africa where two people in love are torn apart by a long time dispute between two influential families, the Zungus and the Ndlovus. Kind of like Romeo and Juliet’s story. Isibaya teasers have been making faithful viewers very eager to watch the upcoming episodes, from the part where Thandeka will be getting support from the Bhubesini community to the scene where Phumelele misinterprets and misjudges Mpiyakhe’s engagements or actions.

But what also makes the TV audiences appreciate and love this series is its theme song Wangala composed by Philip Miller which also featured Siyabonga Thwala. Based in Cape Town, Philip Miller is a South African composer and sound artist who had made musical composition soundtracks and music narratives for many local and global movie and television productions.

What makes South African music distinctive is its passionate need for creativity and self-expression which is why music and dance are integral part of the South African cultural identity. They have vibrant and lively music with an extensive selection of genre and styles that were created throughout the years. For instance, the political atmosphere of South Africa has made a huge impact and impression on its music which gave way to the making of unique music genres like the Kwaito and the Mbube.

The Kwaito

The Kwaito materialized during the 1990s, the same period when Nelson Mandela became the first democratically voted president of South Africa. What significantly altered the music business of South Africa was the elimination of economic and political sanctions.

The Mbube

The Mbube on the other hand, considering its background dates back to the 1920s in the Natal region when factories and coalmines were extremely booming. Because of this, Zulu men from neighboring settlements gathered to the area in search for work bringing with them their own cultural identities. To keep and safeguard this sense of communion, choirs were created. After labor hours, they would have social gatherings that primarily encompassed singing and dancing. They had singing contests that displayed their abilities and as an incentive to the best singers were given honor, not money. As these kinds of competitions gained reputation so did this new style of music.

 

 

Songs That Shaped The Struggle

 

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