The Art of Product Packaging – The Process

Who says art is limited to music, painting, drawings, and sculpture? Definitely, there is art in designing the right packaging for every product.

Your kitchen is filled with many types of packaging materials that had gone through many essential processes. These cartons of milk, cereals, and even cartons of meds have gone through print inspection to make sure that the public is informed of the right data.

The Package creation process

Everything starts with a dieline. A dieline is the design or pattern that will show how a packaging will look like. It includes the folds, the creases, the location of graphic images, the bleed, and other important details for the product. To give you a visual view of a dieline, carefully unfold a carton of cereals and lay it flat on a table. Notice how it looks like. It has all the folds the creases and you know at which section of the folds the labels and other graphic materials are.

Print Inspection

When the dieline had been sent to the printing company, the dieline will go through quality assurance. Meaning each section, graphic, and text are going to be checked for accuracy. Once accuracy had been confirmed, the very first print will go through print inspection. This is the stage in the process where inspection is done visually on real printed package, making sure that everything is in place from text to graphics, color, and resolution. Once client approval had been received, batch printing will take place.

The quality of the print run depends extensively on the maker’s process. Little mistakes can lead to serious consequences ranging from wasted machine times and valuable materials to costly reprints or even termination of contracts.

Checking the printed sheets before the printer runs is a necessity. To accomplish this, you will have to use the right tools for that. Print checks are done manually or with the right tools is intricate. Print inspection done with the right tools decreases downtime and therefore increases production time.


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